Archive for the ‘sacrifice’ Tag

Jesus Is Not Pretending – God REALLY IS Humble!

Jesus is humble

Audio – Part 1a: 34 min

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2019/09/19.1.27-jesus-is-not-pretending-god-really-is-humble-part-a-john-13.1-15-matt-26.26-30-tah.mp3”

Audio – Part 1b: 34 min

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2019/09/19.1.27-jesus-is-not-pretending-god-really-is-humble-part-b-john-13.1-15-matt-26.26-30-tah.mp3.mp3”

Audio – Full Message:

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2019/09/19.1.27-jesus-is-not-pretending-god-really-is-humble-john-13.1-15-matthew-26.26-30-tah.mp3”


Bible Verses: Matthew 26:26-30 John 13:1-15


For more than a thousand years, the Passover meal celebrated God’s deliverance in the exodus of His people from Egypt and simultaneously pointed ahead to an even grander sacrifice and work of God. Jesus reinterpreted the Passover meal in light of Himself and His coming sacrifice on the cross for the sins of the world. With a demonstration of authority and humility, Jesus set forth the pattern of countless Communion celebrations that now point back to His new covenant sacrifice and point forward to His coming kingdom with holy anticipation.

Theological Theme:

The Lord’s Supper points to our participation in the sacrificial nature of Christ’s life and death, and the humble nature of God – Father, Son and Spirit.

Christ Connection:

Hundreds of years before Jesus came, God made a covenant with Israel and sealed it with a sacrifice. When the people of God broke the covenant and worshiped false gods, God promised to enact a new covenant in which He would forgive sins and write His law on His people’s hearts. At the Last Supper, Jesus explained that His sacrificial death would establish this new covenant and bring forgiveness of sins in the humility of God.

“Why was this sacrament ordained at the time of the Passover? That we might learn that he [Jesus] is the giver of the law and that the things that are foreshadowed in the law are fulfilled in him. The Old Testament was a type of the things to come. He is the truth of those things.” –John Chrysostom (circa 347-407)

“Humility is the principle of all virtues: it removes any contrast, division or dissension from human beings and plants into them peace and charity. And through charity it grows and increases.” –Theodore of Mopsuestia (circa 350-422)

Missional Application:

God the Father calls us to take the Lord’s Supper, participating in his humility by the Spirit, looking back to Christ’s finished work and looking forward to his return.

“Throughout church history, this command to wash one another’s feet has been understood to mean we should do whatever it takes to serve one another, no matter how menial the task. To be a community of foot-washers is to live with this question on your lips: ‘Is there anything I can do for you?’” –H. B. Charles Jr.

“The ideal of a church community living in peace with one another is foundational to the evangelistic witness for the local congregation. It stands to reason that the Lord’s Supper, then, is not just an observance but a declaration about the way things are to be among God’s people. The meal contains a message not only about who Christ is and what He has done for the church, but who is included in the gospel story and in the benefits of Christ’s glory. It is a story of belonging, and a radical message that God intends for His people to identify with all believers, whether they are poor, weak, or forgotten.” –Gregory Alan Thornbury

Photo Compliments: cisphil.org

Are You Becoming More Like Mary or Judas?

Generosity or Greed 1

Audio – Part 1a: 36 min

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/19.1.06-are-you-becoming-more-like-mary-or-judas-part-a-matthew-26.6-16-tah.mp3”

Audio – Part 1b: 36 min

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/19.1.06-are-you-becoming-more-like-mary-or-judas-part-b-matthew-26.6-16-tah.mp3.mp3”

Audio – Full Message:

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/19.1.06-are-you-becoming-more-like-mary-or-judas-matthew-26-6-16-tah.mp3”


Bible Verses: Matthew 26:6-16


The account of Jesus’ anointing at Bethany contrasts the generosity of a woman and the greed of Judas. In their respective responses to Jesus, we see the importance of giving Him priority and honor over everything in our lives. The distinction between these two people serves as an opportunity for us to consider our own hearts in light of the opportunity we have to express our devotion through visible acts of worship.

Theological Theme:

Our heart’s condition is revealed either by our giving or by our greed.

Christ Connection:

Pouring expensive oil on Jesus was not a waste but an act of worship. By allowing Mary to anoint Him, Jesus showed that He is more valuable than anything. This act of devotion foreshadowed Jesus’ death and burial.

“Matthew’s unnamed woman is Jesus’ invitation to all women, and men and children, to come to the table of Christian koinonia… There is no hierarchy of holiness upon entrance, and there is no pedigree and no degree requirement for entrance. The only prerequisite is faith in Jesus. All who have faith in Jesus can come for a meal.” 4 –Sean Douglas O’Donnell

Missional Application:

God calls us to treasure Christ above all wealth and to express our devotion through visible acts of worship.

“Jesus’s teaching consistently attracted the irreligious while offending the Bible-believing, religious people of his day…That can only mean one thing. If the preaching of our ministers and the practice of our parishioners do not have the same effect on people that Jesus had, then we must not be declaring the same message that Jesus did.” –Timothy Keller

Photo Compliments: thumbs.dreamstime.com

Jesus is the Ultimate Atonement and Sacrifice, Part 1

leviticus-1-atonement

Part 1:https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/16-09-18-jesus-is-the-ultimate-atonement-and-sacrifice-part-1a-leviticus-1-e28093-3-i-john-2-1-2-tah.mp3”

Part 2:https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/16-09-18-jesus-is-the-ultimate-atonement-and-sacrifice-part-1b-leviticus-1-e28093-3-i-john-2-1-2-tah.mp3”

Full Sermon:https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/16-09-18-jesus-is-the-ultimate-atonement-and-sacrifice-part-1-leviticus-1-e28093-3-i-john-2-1-2-tah.mp3”

Theological Theme: The burnt offering was for the removal of the people’s guilt before God; the grain offering restored Israel to serve God and neighbor, and the fellowship offering was for the reconciliation between God the Father and His people.

Christ Connection: Because of Jesus’ ultimate sacrifice, we celebrate the removal of our guilt before God, the freedom to serve God on His mission, and the restoration of our relationship with God – Father, Son and Spirit.

Missional Application: Because we who share in Christ’s life have been freed from our guilt, God the Holy Spirit calls us to serve Him by serving others.

*photo courtesy of pinterest.com

The Covenant-making Triune God Tests Abraham

God will provide - Gen 22

https://trinityandhumanity.files.wordpress.com/2016/04/16-03-20-the-covenant-making-triune-god-tests-abraham-gen-22-tah-guest-marra1.mp3”

Theological Theme: Faith is trusting in God to keep His promise to provide salvation.

Christ Connection: Isaac’s question “Where is the lamb for the sacrifice?” echoes through the pages of the Old Testament and is ultimately answered at the beginning of the New Testament when John the Baptist sees Jesus of Nazareth and declares, “Behold the Lamb!”

Missional Application: God calls us to be people of faith who, like Abraham, are so filled with confidence in God’s resurrection power that we are willing to sacrifice for His mission.

 

Lent: Giving Up What Doesn’t Serve

Letting Go of what doesn't serve We are in the special liturgical season of Lent now, and for many people, it is a time of giving something up. That may mean giving up a habit one wishes to break, ranging from swearing to promiscuity to eating sweets, or it can mean sacrificing for forty days something one likes very much, like listening to an iPod or eating meat on Fridays. Some believers even go to extremes, inflicting pain on themselves to prove their devotion to Christ.

I’ve heard a number of explanations about how the attitude of sacrifice can benefit us. Some say each time we want to eat meat on a Friday or listen to our iPod, it is a reminder of the pain of Christ’s sacrifice. Others look at the period of Lent as extra fuel to help us break the hold that sin has on us, particularly in the form of bad habits. But what if Lent was more?

I’ve been thinking about the Lenten season differently this year after I saw a Facebook friend comment that his family was giving up “smallness of vision.” This could be interpreted a number of ways, but to me, this means giving up what doesn’t serve or what no longer fits my life. Some aspects of life that no longer serve me include:

  • giving up a narrow definition of God and instead, embracing the Mystery that seems to seek me out in the most unusual and unexpected places.
  • letting go of fear and uncertainty and instead, acknowledging that One greater than me has my back.
  • sacrificing cynicism and distrust and instead, seeing the living Christ in everyone.
  • surrendering the need to judge and instead, accepting that diversity with unity is possible, even preferable.
  • forfeiting views of ministry that seem to be focused on results more than people and instead, ministering with God to those who are part of my daily life and work.

By looking at the ways I’ve made myself, my life, or my God too small, I can let go and broaden my vision. This Lenten sacrifice will do more than help me lose weight or break a bad habit. Giving up that which no longer serves me enlarges my worldview and transforms my response to the Father, Son, and Spirit. By letting go of “smallness of vision,” I can see more clearly the work of the Triune God in my life and in the world, and I’m inspired and energized to be a part of it.

~by Nan Kuhlman

 

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